An Amusement Park makes a wonderful physics laboratory. Here is some information from Six Flags Fiesta Texas, in San Antonio. Thanks to Clarence Bakken for his help. He got me hooked on using an amusement park as a learning laboratory.

Here is student data collected. Only a few representative files are posted. The data is in Logger Pro. If the school does not have Logger Pro, a free 30 day trial can be downloaded from www.vernier.com.






These are Iron Rattler files.


Here is a file with resources related to amusement park physics.



The following data has been collected previously from various rides using the Vernier WDSS system. The data will include altitude as well as acceleration in the x,y and z dimensions. The files are in Logger Pro.

This is data taken from the Iron Rattler, a hybrid wood and steel roller coaster. It compares front and back seats on the train.

Here is a graphic of the Iron Rattler.
IronRattler05_11x17_600dpi.jpg

Here is another graphic of the Iron Rattler, including descriptions of the various parts of the ride.

Iron Rattler Coaster Sheet1.jpg

Here is a Logger Pro file of actual student data collected from the Iron Rattler. It is linked to areas of the graphic above.



Here is a video of the Iron Rattler at the base of the lift hill. It can be used to calculate the velocity of the train at the bottom of the hill. It may be easier to download the videos.




This is data taken from the Boomerang, a looping coaster. It compares front and back seats on the train.



Here is a graphic of the Boomerang.
boomerang.jpg

Here is a video of the loop of the Boomerang. It can be used to calculate the velocity of the train entering the loop, at the top of the loop and exiting the loop.




This is data taken from the Poltergeist, a coaster that uses linear induction motors (LIM) to launch the train.


Here is a video of the Poltergeist during the launch phase. It can be used to calculate the velocity of the train as it exits the LIM.



This is data taken from the Whirligig, a rotating swings ride.


This is data from Scream!, a tower drop ride. It is interesting that the drop from the top is not really free fall.


This data is taken from Goliath, a steel coaster.


This data is taken from Superman, a larger steel looping coaster.


This data is taken from Crow's Nest, a Ferris Wheel.


This data is taken from Power Surge, a water coaster ride.


SFFT_Batman.jpg